Press

“Cybercrime Project Receives $10 Million from NSF"
September 28, 2012  |  Caroline Murphy, The Daily Californian

A project conducted by researchers from the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute, UC San Diego and George Mason University has received a $10 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to study social and economic issues connected to cybercrime. While much of cyber-security research focuses on the technological side of attacks, Beyond Technical Security: Developing an Empirical Basis for Socio-Economic Perspectives will take an interdisciplinary look into cybercriminals — how they work with each other, the marketplaces that they work in and the profit they gain.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) this week awarded $50 million for more than 70 research projects focused on securing cyberspace in the United States. The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace awards are aimed at protecting critical infrastructure from cyberthreats. "Securing cyberspace is key to America's global economic competitiveness and prosperity," said NSF Director Subra Suresh, in a statement. "NSF's investment in the fundamental research of cybersecurity is core to national security and economic vitality that embraces efficiency while also maintaining privacy."

Computer scientists at the Univ. of California, San Diego, the International Computer Science Institute at Berkeley and George Mason University have received a $10 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to map out the illicit activities taking place in the cybersecurity underworld and to understand how the mind of a cybercriminal works.

“UC Berkeley Part of $10 Million NSF Study of ‘Human Element’ in Cybercrime"
September 25, 2012  |  Steven Brown, San Francisco Business Times

Experts from the University of California and George Mason University will study the "human element" of cybercrime with the help of a $10 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation. The NSF is giving the money to the International Computer Science Institute on Center Street in downtown Berkeley, as well as to teams from UC San Diego and George Mason University.

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, the International Computer Science Institute at Berkeley and George Mason University have received a $10 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to map out the illicit activities taking place in the cybersecurity underworld and to understand how the mind of a cybercriminal works.

“PharmaLeaks: Rogue Pharmacy Economics 101"
June 22, 2012  |  Brian Krebs, Krebs On Security

Consumer demand for cheap prescription drugs sold through spam-advertised Web sites shows no sign of abating, according to a new analysis of bookkeeping records maintained by three of the world’s largest rogue pharmacy operations. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the International Computer Science Institute and George Mason University examined caches of data tracking the day-to-day finances of GlavMed, SpamIt, and Rx-Promotion, shadowy affiliate programs that over a four-year period processed more than $170 million worth of orders from customers seeking cheaper, more accessible and more discretely available drugs. The result is perhaps the most detailed analysis yet of the business case for the malicious software and spam epidemics that persist to this day.

“BufferBloat: What’s Wrong With the Internet?”
February 2012 | Vint Cerf, Van Jacobson, Nick Weaver, and Jim Gettys, Communications of the ACM

Internet delays are now as common as they are maddening. That means they end up affecting system engineers just like all the rest of us. And when system engineers get irritated, they often go looking for what's at the root of the problem. Take Jim Gettys, for example. His slow home network had repeatedly proved to be the source of considerable frustration, so he set out to determine what was wrong, and he even coined a term for what he found: bufferbloat.

"Online Privacy Could Keep You and Your Home Safe from Robberies"
January 11, 2012  |  Kristen Kella, Northwestern University Medill Reports

Social media and mapping web sites are tools of the trade for criminals looking for the perfect house to rob, ex-burglars told researchers in the United Kingdom. Nearly 80 percent of the burglars used social media to case homes, they told the Crimestoppers Trust, and the wealth of online information helps make an efficient operation of a burglary.

"Internet Accounts for Almost 2 Percent of the World’s Total Energy Consumption"
October 30, 2011  |  Paras Shah, The Daily Californian

UC Berkeley researchers have estimated that it takes between 1 and 2 percent of the world’s energy to construct, run and maintain the Internet. According to the research, which will be presented Nov. 14 at the Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks in Cambridge, Mass., the Internet uses between 170 and 307 gigawatts — about 1.1 to 1.9 percent of the 16 terrawatts of energy consumed by humanity.

When you’re trying to figure out statistics about something as nebulous and pervasive as “the Internet,” you’re going to have to performs some interesting mental contortions. After all, how many things out there are connected to the Internet? How many of those things would you consider to be actively “using” it, how much power is there in the world? All valid and difficult questions, valid and difficult questions that Justin Ma and Barath Raghavan, of UC Berkeley and the International Computer Science Institute respectively, were determined to tackle.

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