Press

With this tool, AI could identify new malware as readily as it recognizes cats
April 18, 2018 | Jackie Snow, MIT Technology Review

“The hacker will find an example anyway,” says Gerald Friedland, a computer science professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

A ‘Cryptocurrency’ Without a Blockchain Is Eating My City
April 18, 2018 | Jordan Pearson, Motherboard

This raises a pertinent question: If BTZ is working fine without a blockchain, why does it need one? "That this is private record keeping only makes the system better [than if it had a blockchain], since that at least is efficient,” Nicholas Weaver, a senior researcher at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, California, wrote me in an email.

“This is a market failure,” said Serge Egelman, a co-author of the study and the director of usable security and privacy research at the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California at Berkeley. “The rampant potential violations that we have uncovered points out basic enforcement work that needs to be done.”

Researchers at the University of California's International Computer Science Institute analyzed 5,855 of the most downloaded kids apps, concluding that most of them are "are potentially in violation" of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act 1998, or COPPA, a federal law making it illegal to collect personally identifiable data on children under 13.

NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt
April 17, 2018 | Serge Egelman appearance on NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt

Serge Egelman discussed the usable security and privacy group's findings that thousands of Android apps marketed to children may be illegally leaking data on a segment of the show "NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt" on April 17, 2018.

Thousands of Android apps potentially violate child protection law
April 16, 2018 | Samuel Gibbs, The Guardian

“We identified several concerning violations and trends,” wrote the authors of the Proceedings on Privacy Enhancing Technologies, led by researchers at the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. “Overall, roughly 57% of the 5,855 child-directed apps that we analysed are potentially violating Coppa.”

Additionally, the study — led by researchers at the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley — says the apps that are improperly collecting and sharing data are all included in Google’s Designed for Families program.

Thousands of Android apps improperly tracking kids' activities
April 16, 2018 | Henry T. Casey, Fox News

The study, which comes from researchers at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, CA, analyzed 5,855 of the most popular free Android apps targeted at kids and families. The team found its results with an automatic test that detects how data is handled in Android apps.

Researchers from the International Computer Science Institute say the majority of popular, free children's Android apps are tracking data on kids in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, a federal law that regulates data collection from users who are under 13 years old.

Thousands of Android Mobile Apps Improperly Track Children, Study Says
April 13, 2018 | Benjamin Herold, Education Week

"These problems are rampant, and it's resulting in kids being exposed to targeted advertising and automatic profiling that could be illegal," said Serge Egelman, who co-authored the report and works as the director of usable security and privacy research at ICSI, which is connected with the University of California, Berkeley.

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